Nintendo of Canada Reveals Holiday Mall Experience

Nintendo of Canada has announced their upcoming Holiday Mall Experience, which will begin on Monday, December 8th in three cities across Canada and last until Sunday, December 21st.

There, Nintendo fans will have the opportunity to try out several of the hottest games from the past year, including Super Smash Bros. for Wii U, Mario Kart 8, Captain Toad: Treasure Tracker, and Hyrule Warriors for Wii U. On the Nintendo 3DS side, there’s Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS, Pokémon Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire, Mario Kart 7, Kirby Triple Deluxe, and Yoshi’s New Island to check out.

Plus, if you snap a picture of you and your friends playing at the Nintendo Holiday Mall Experience and post it to social media with the hash tag #NintendoCanadaHoliday, you’ll have a chance to win some branded Nintendo prizing. If you’re a lucky winner, then the Nintendo team will message your social media account directly.

The full schedule of locations, dates, and times is as follows:

Coquitlam, BC:

Coquitlam Centre, 2929 Barnet Hwy #1204

Hours:
December 8–12: 10am-9pm
December 13: 9:30am-9pm
December 14: 10am-6pm
December 15–19: 10am–9pm
December 20: 9:30am-9pm
December 21: 10am-9pm

Scarborough, ON:

Scarborough Town Centre, 300 Borough Drive

Hours:
December 8–13: 9:30am-9:30pm
December 14: 10am-8pm
December 15–20: 9:30am-9:30pm
December 21: 10am-8pm

Pointe Claire, QC:

Fairview Pointe Claire, 6801 Pointe-Claire

Hours:
December 8-12: 10am-9pm
December 13–14: 9am-5pm
December 15-17: 10am-9pm
December 18-19: 9am-9pm
December 20-21: 9am-5pm


This week, it looks like we have a small-but-solid sampling of new releases, and a few good deals, too!

WiiU_CaptainToad_scrn01_E3

Captain Toad: Treasure Tracker for Wii U – Available on December 5th, Captain Toad breaks out on his own in an adventure that follows and expands upon “The Adventures of Captain Toad” mini-games from Super Mario 3D World. My review is forthcoming shortly, but in the meantime, you can check out a trailer for the game here.

sonicboomwiiu_06

Sonic Boom: Rise of Lyric – Demo Version for Wii U – Opinions on this game since its release have been mixed, at best. Personally, I enjoyed the demo I played, but I’m currently unable to say whether this is the same one or not. Either way, now you have a chance to make the call for yourself before making the commitment. You can also view a trailer here.

WiiU_FireEmblem_gameplay_03

Fire Emblem for Wii U – As a series, Fire Emblem dates back a couple of decades in Japan, but in the west? Its first release was quite a bit more recent. You can now play the first title to be released in North America, training your armies and planning strategies to best your foes on the battlefield in this 2003 Game Boy Advance title. For a trailer, click here.

WiiU_LodeRunner_gameplay_02

Lode Runner for Wii U – As the de-Bombermanned Bomberman, lay through 50 levels of gold collecting, or create your own in this 1984 NES classic.

N3DS_UltimateNESRemix_gameplay_02

Ultimate NES Remix for Nintendo 3DS – When NES Remix and NES Remix appeared on the Wii U, one thought was heard loud and clear: “Why isn’t this on the Nintendo 3DS?” But now the best of both are here in one package, and you can view a trailer for it here.

christmaswonderland4

Christmas Wonderland 4 for Nintendo 3DS – Holiday-themed mini-games abound in this puzzle collection.

N3DS_DisneyViolettaRM_gameplay_03

Disney Violetta: Rhythm and Music for Nintendo 3DS – Apparently someone named “Violetta” is Disney’s newest music sensation (this lack of knowledge is what happens when Family shows more reruns of Phineas and Ferb than new episodes), and now she has her own game on the Nintendo 3DS. Tap to the rhythm of her songs, unlock more with high scores, and test your Violetta knowledge in quiz mode.

Nintendo eShop Sales

WiiU_99Seconds_gameplay_01

99Seconds for Wii U – Until 8:59am PT on December 26th, this title is reduced from $2.49 to $1.49, more than 40 percent off.

planeswiiu

Walt Disney Birthday Sale: To celebrate the birthday of Walt Disney, Epic Mickey 2: The Power of Two for Wii U, Disney Planes on Nintendo 3DS and Wii U, and “other fun games” will be discounted until 8:59am PT on December 8th.

etrianodysseyiv

Etrian Odyssey IV: Legends of the Titan for Nintendo 3DS – From 9am PT on December 8th until 8:59am PT on December 22nd, this title is reduced from $29.99 to $14.99, 50 percent off.

ShinMegamiTenseiDevilSummon

Shin Megami Tensei: Devil Summoner: Soul Hackers for Nintendo 3DS – From 9am PT on December 8th until 8:59am PT on December 22nd, this title is reduced from $29.99 to $14.99, 50 percent off.

N3DS_Aeternoblade_04

AeternoBlade for Nintendo 3DS – From 9am PT on December 5th until 8:59am PT on December 19th, this title is reduced from $14.99 to $7.99, more than 40 percent off.

n3ds_airace_02

AiRace Xeno for Nintendo 3DS – Until 8:59am PT on December 25th, this title is reduced from $2.49 to $1.69, 40 percent off.

For more information, screens, and videos for each of this week’s releases, click on the corresponding links above.

While Nintendo of Canada revealed their holiday plans just over a month ago, there were a few notable omissions from the forecast. Specifically, not only Super Smash Bros. for Wii U and the new amiibo line of figures, but Captain Toad: Treasure Tracker as well.

Today, that has all changed, as the company has filled in these blanks with a new announcement telling us pretty much everything we need to know.

First, Super Smash Bros. for Wii U will be available on November 21st at a manufacturer’s suggested retail price (MSRP) of $64.99. One might also recall the announcement of new GameCube controllers and adapters for those controllers for those (such as myself) who prefer to play Smash that way. The adapter, which can support four GameCube/Wavebird controllers (the maximum needed for local multiplayer action) will retail for $22.99. The Super Smash Bros. insignia-branded versions of the GameCube controllers will go for $32.99 each.

Or, if you’re in need of the entire lot, a special bundle that includes Super Smash Bros. for Wii U, one Nintendo GameCube controller, and one adapter will be available for $99.99. The downside? It’s exclusive to EB Games.

What’s more, a report from VentureBeat reports that you’ll be able to use GameCube controllers with more than just Super Smash Bros. for Wii U through the adapter. According to Nintendo’s online store:

This adapter will allow you to connect your GameCube controller to the Nintendo Wii or Wii U. Connect your GameCube controller to your Wii or Wii U console. Compatible with all games supported by the Wii Classic Controller, Wii Classic Controller Pro and Wii U Pro Controller.

amiibo_group

Going hand-in-hand with the release of Super Smash Bros. for Wii U will be the compatible amiibo figures. Already available for pre-order at a price of $13.99 each, the first wave of figures (featuring Mario, Peach, Yoshi, Donkey Kong, Link, Fox, Samus, Wii Fit Trainer, Villager, Pikachu, Kirby, and Marth) will be released alongside Super Smash Bros. for Wii U, while a second wave consisting of Zelda, Diddy Kong, Luigi, Little Mac, Pit, and Captain Falcon is slated for an as-yet unspecified time in December.

Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS is already in the hands of more than 2.8 million people worldwide, and the road ahead looks great,” said Nintendo of Canada’s vice-president and general manager, Ron Bertram. “Nintendo’s holiday software lineup is more than impressive, and our amiibo figures start a new chapter in the world of Nintendo interactive entertainment. With so many great experiences available, this holiday season is going to be an amazing time to be a Nintendo fan.”

As a reminder, Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS will later be able to use amiibo figures, as well as upcoming releases such as Mario Party 10 and Yoshi’s Woolly World. The already-released Mario Kart 8 will also make use of them at some point to be determined in the future.

WiiU_CaptainToad_scrn05_E3

Finally, Captain Toad: Treasure Tracker has a release date of December 5th, and will retail for $44.99. What’s more, this game will support amiibo figures as well, though that functionality won’t be available at launch; rather, players will have to wait until 2015 to see what they’ll bring to the experience.

Nintendo recently (well, sort of– long story) held an event for local Canadian outlets to try out some of the new and upcoming games which were shown off earlier this summer at the Electronic Entertainment Expo in Los Angeles. As always, Mario’s Hat was there, and while I didn’t get to try out everything on offer, I did get to sample some of the juicier bits enough to provide some impressions.

Wii U

super-smash-bros-wiiu

Super Smash Bros. for Wii U

Naturally, this was the big one for people to gravitate to, with two dedicated stations for playing it (the next-closest thing was three stations on which a number of demos were loaded). Better still, this opportunity presented an option not available at Best Buy: GameCube controllers, courtesy of the recently-announced adapter. The controllers themselves had seen better days, but they still did the job, as they felt more natural than my previous effort with the Wii U GamePad.

Also beneficial was the opportunity to go more than one round. The game feels closer to a midway point between Super Smash Bros. Melee and Brawl in terms of speed and competitiveness, and Mega Man is definitely going to take some getting used to. Despite the feeling that he’d fit me like a glove after watching him in videos, it’s proving to be a tight glove; he fits, but I still need more time to break him in, as some of his moves feel a bit more nuanced than I was expecting, mostly as a matter of timing.

Having heard how well he performed at the San Diego Comic-Con’s tournament, I gave Bowser a try next, and he seemed very, very slow to me; not as much in his basic movements, but more in his ability to perform special moves. But then, I’ve never been a big Bowser player, so that probably doesn’t help matters much.

I also tried Little Mac, but much like Mega Man, I think I’m going to need to spend more time with him before I really feel comfortable using him. I’m not sure if it’s me, or just a pattern among new challengers.

Finally, I went to my mainstay: Mario. Aside from having to deal with F.L.U.D.D. again (I’m eager to see what customization can do for me there), it was like coming home again. Much as I was eager to try new characters, I should probably have gone straight to Mario in order to form an opinion. Once we clicked again, things went a bit better for us. I didn’t always win, but I did feel like things were where they needed to be, and they felt good.

Some of the stages were pretty good, too. My favorite so far has to be the Punch-Out!! stage, though Dr. Wily’s castle, the Battlefield, the Fire Emblem arena, and others have felt pretty solid.

With a game containing as much content as this one, and with as little as what was available to us here, it’s hard to form a very complete opinion overall. Still, I have a very good feeling about this one. I don’t know if it will please the hardcore Melee fans, but whereas the Best Buy experience left me uncertain, I now fully and eagerly anticipate good times ahead.

WiiU_HyruleWarriors_scrn01_E3

Hyrule Warriors

Have you ever played a game from The Legend of Zelda series, gotten a brand-new powered-up sword, and just wanted swathes of enemies to come after you all at once so you could simply tear them down with one mighty, enormous sword swing? It’s a feeling I’ve had all too often, and one that often feels like it goes unfulfilled.

Not so in Hyrule Warriors. Though no new sword power-up was required, it nonetheless provided that most desired sensation as I tore through huge platoons of enemy Bokoblins, sending them flying and falling left and right.

The demo gave a good sense of what to expect from the gameplay, offering three playable characters to choose from (Link, Zelda, and Midna), and one battlefield to run around on. Several objectives come up on the field, as you try to secure keeps and obtain items, such as the bombs which are hidden in a nearby cave (and which anyone seems to be able to use, throwing a volley with each press of the button). I only got to use Link and Midna, and while Link is great for cutting through enemies, Midna just manages to plow through them in the most joyful of ways. The end result is by and large the same, but the joys of getting there tend to differ.

It’s no secret that the ever-increasing focus on puzzles in Zelda have left me weary, and that I much prefer the action-oriented aspects of the series. Fortunately, Hyrule Warriors looks to be delivering on that in a big way (while still retaining some exploration and discovery elements) when it comes out at the end of September. At the moment, I think it’s the game on this list I’m most looking forward to– at least, that isn’t named “Super Smash Bros.,” and even that’s iffy at the moment.

All this, and I’ve yet to even touch the multiplayer.

WiiU_Bayonetta2_scrn07_E3

Bayonetta 1 and 2

I’ve never played Bayonetta. Not for any particular reason (not outside of “time” and “money,” anyway), it just never happened. So when I got to the carefully-positioned kiosk set away from all the others to have a look-see, I was presented with the question: “Bayonetta 1 or 2?”

I asked the difference, and was informed that the first game had a greater emphasis on exploration, whereas the sequel focused more on action. Well heck, I was on a loosely-defined sense of a schedule, so I decided to go for quick-n-satisfying action and leave exploration for when I could sit down with it.

That said, Bayonetta 2 is just so crazy and off the wall… I loved it. I can’t even begin to describe all the craziness here, though one recurring moment that sticks out in my mind is when I’d fight a foe, a meat grinder (or something) would pop up out of the ground, and as they tried to resist the pull of its conveyor belt, I’d kick them in– blood and bits strewn everywhere, though I’m not sure I’d describe it as exceptionally detailed gore, either.

Not for kids or the faint of heart, but very over the top, fluid, and fun. My kind of game, and it kind of reminds me of some of my favorite elements from Mortal Kombat, too.

WiiU_CaptainToad_scrn01_E3

Captain Toad: Treasure Tracker

Aside from how any slight movement of the Wii U GamePad would adjust the camera, the Captain Toad levels in Super Mario 3D World were some of my favorite parts of the game, providing a fun mini-game-esque diversion from the main quest which still benefited you greatly if you were to succeed. The big question, however, is “can this work as a full-price retail game?”

The jury is still out on that one, though from what I could tell, the camera didn’t seem as sensitive to movement here, so that’s a plus. In any case, the puzzles herein seemed to have a greater level of depth as opposed to those seen in the full 3D Mario adventure. The more I see of it, though, and having played it in person, I’m really looking forward to the final game. It feels like at the right price, it might not win “Game of the Year,” but could nonetheless be a potential sleeper hit for Nintendo.

WiiU_Yoshi'sWW_scrn07_E3

Yoshi’s Woolly World

While Yoshi’s New Island was not by any means a poor game, it did feel a bit lacking– particularly as a fan of the original Yoshi’s Island, which the New installment did excruciatingly little to break away from. Simply put, it was like Yoshi’s Island‘s equivalent of Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels in terms of series progression (though clearly not in difficulty).

But from what I got to play, the spark I felt was lacking in Yoshi’s New Island felt like it was present in Yoshi’s Wooly World. It’s too soon to say for sure, but adding some of the ideas and aesthetic appeal from Kirby’s Epic Yarn to Yoshi’s world felt like it was the right progression for both. Included in that is the option for two-player action, which I engaged in with my wife, and which we both enjoyed.

Yoshi’s Story aside, it seems like follow-ups have tried to be like the original, and it’s worked to their detriment. Yoshi’s Wooly World, on the other hand, seems to break away from Yoshi’s Island‘s most iconic feature– the visual style and aesthetic– and grows from there. Hopefully it will end up proving to be the true sequel we’ve waited so long for.

Oh, and there’s no Baby Mario– that’s a big plus right there.

WiiU_MarioMaker_scrn01_E3

Mario Maker

Below, you’re going to notice that I didn’t get to play several games at the event for different reasons, mostly being a matter of priority versus time, but also because some of them didn’t quite feel right to me in the hustle-n-bustle environment they were in.

I thought Mario Maker would be one of those games I’d rather just sit down with and just play around with until I hit my stride, but to my surprise, just watching others play it made me want to play it. Seeing how others were setting up blocks, enemies, and obstacles got the wheels turning in my own head, formulating my own ideas I just had to try myself.

That’s a surprising part of the appeal of Mario Maker, it turns out– it can draw a bit of a crowd, and spectators are all likely to have their own ideas of what should be in the game, or will wonder just what cockamamie design you’re trying to implement. And doing so is fun, too, be it as a spectator or as you’re designing the level yourself. The interface is rather simple, and you can perform on-the-fly testing as often as you need before turning your creation loose.

It’s like art meets game design, and just feels a lot more fun than your run-of-the-mill level editors that you find in other games. Level editors have been in Nintendo games for years, dating back to the likes of Excitebike and Wrecking Crew, but I can’t remember a time when they’ve felt as fun as this. Heck, one would think a Mega Man fan such as myself would leap at the opportunity to create my own levels in Capcom’s 2006 game Mega Man Powered Up for the PlayStation Portable, but I don’t think I ever got around to designing a single board. But I can’t wait to get more time with Mario Maker.

By the sound of things, we’ve only seen the tip of what the full game will offer in terms of design options, too. Early 2015 can’t get here quickly enough.

WiiU_Kirby_scrn07_E3

Kirby and the Rainbow Curse

Much to my regret, chagrin, and other words indicating displeasure, I never got to play the highly-regarded Nintendo DS title Kirby’s Canvas Curse, one of the earlier, more innovative, and apparently best titles in the system’s early days. Fortunately, luck has smiled upon me as a sequel has been announced for the Wii U.

From what I can gather, this title plays much the same as its predecessor, though it trades out the earlier game’s paint-like aesthetic for one made to resemble colored clay. Using the stylus, you control Kirby (who is stuck in a ball form) and draw ropes, ramps, loops, and more for him to follow to reach new places and get past his foes.

Playing it, I can see where the reputation of the original came from, and I look forward to playing more in 2015.

WiiU_MARIOvsDK_scrn01_E3

Mario vs. Donkey Kong

I didn’t get to play this one due to a lack of time/the overall busyness of the event. That said, it’s yet another in the Lemmings-style of Mario vs. Donkey Kong, rather than my preference, the Donkey Kong ’94-style that launched the series. That said, it certainly looked really nice on a high-definition television, and watching some people play did make me want to snatch the GamePad away and say “no, like this!”, so maybe I should give it another go when it comes out.

Project Guard & Project Giant Robot

Unfortunately, though these two were there, I didn’t have time to try them out. Admittedly, they were kind of low on my list, perhaps due to the hints that they’re both part of the upcoming new Star Fox title that are not yet fully formed. Still, people seemed to be enjoying them, and I do wish I’d gotten to try them. Alas, it was not to be… this time.

Art Academy

Another game that was on hand, but I didn’t really get to try, as the environment didn’t really feel right for it (some games feel more like something I’d rather sit down with for a while, rather than form impressions in a really busy environment). Also, no time– maybe if there was more. Still, I’d love to give it a go when it comes out on October 24th, 2014.

Nintendo 3DS

super-smash-bros-3ds

Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS

Okay, I’m going to be up front about this: I don’t like this one as much as the Wii U version. In fact, so far, I don’t think anyone I know has.

That isn’t to say it’s bad, however; I did enjoy my second time with the game since playing it at Best Buy back in June, and I even got to play a regular match this time. Really, I believe it all comes down to one simple thing that could very well make or break this experience.

Control customization.

In a game like this, a certain sense of immersion is key. You can’t stop to think about how you’re going to do what you need to do, you have to be able to do it instinctively, reflexively at a moment’s notice. I simply was not feeling that here.

It’s a very simple thing, one which can make or break a game, but one not afforded in the demo version that I was able to tell. The way the face buttons are mapped in this demo was counter-intuitive to me, or at least to my familiarity with the GameCube controls. I was able to adjust to them somewhat, but it took a more concentrated effort, and in the heat of a battle, it’s easy enough to lose yourself as well, which can wreck things.

I can’t say for certain, but if the final version allows me to remap the buttons, I think I’ll like the game a whole lot more. As it is, I saw the game again at a separate, more recent event, and ultimately passed it over for the Wii U version (and for Hyrule Warriors).

Fortunately, director Masahiro Sakurai is one of the best in the business– especially at Nintendo– for allowing various options and customization in his games, including Super Smash Bros. Brawl. Heck, that we’re even getting the option to use GameCube controllers in the Wii U version feels like a testament to that. So I do have confidence (and fingers crossed) that he will allow us to choose what feels right for us and go from there.

Until that point, though, I have a certain reluctance about this one. I’m sure it will be good, but will it be great?

3DS_LaytonVsWright_E3_scrn16

Professor Layton vs. Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney

I skipped on this one for two main reasons: 1) The frantic environment of the event isn’t really the type I like to play such games in, and 2) It was coming out so soon, anyway, that I figured it would be better to focus on other things at the show while I had time. In fact, I have my review copy now, so there you go.

3DS_FantasyLife_E3_01

Fantasy Life

I didn’t really get a chance to give this a go, but it looks interesting. Another title I’d rather sit down with and get to know more personally, rather than meet-and-greet amidst talking to people and such.

Pokémon Art Academy

Okay, I know I said I wasn’t in the mood to do this there, but the Nintendo 3DS unit housing this demo was open while I was waiting for a shot at Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS. I gave it a shot, though I didn’t draw any Pokemon— instead, I drew a Goomba, to the amusement of some others around. Not bad, but I’d need to spend more time with it, even though the primary function seems to be teaching one how to draw Pokemon.

—–

During the event, I had the opportunity to speak with Matt Ryan of Nintendo of Canada, who noted that Super Smash Bros. “will be our biggest launch this holiday,” including the October 3rd release of the Nintendo 3DS game, and that the amiibo figures would be arriving day-and-date with the as-yet unspecified release date of the Wii U version. He also pointed out that another title that was absent from the show, Pokémon Omega Ruby and Pokémon Alpha Saphire, is also expected to do quite well in November, especially with the “more serious” Pokémon fan.

On a more personal level, Ryan notes that he is really looking forward to Hyrule Warriors. “Ever since I first saw that game, the graphics looked amazing. The gameplay and the physics of it all play really well.”

“While I haven’t played a lot of Dynasty Warriors, I have played, and it’s fun and I love that over-the-top action, like taking out the hordes of enemies. Splicing in The Legend of Zelda‘s look and feel, and the realm of Hyrule and the characters like Link and Zelda– it’s awesome. It’s one of the best-looking games I’ve seen on the Wii U.”

—–

Though I didn’t get to play everything, I came away with an overall positive feeling about (and from) the games Nintendo showed off at their post-E3 event. Some I need to spend more time with, and Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS does give me pause, but it’s an overall strong lineup going into the holidays and beyond, and I can’t wait to experience more of it.

A huge thanks to the folks at Nintendo of Canada for having us to the event, and for taking the time to speak with us!

As August draws to a close, Nintendo is looking past the end days of summer to bring us information on what to expect going into the 2014 holiday season.

Unfortunately, the big question on everyone’s mind– “When is Super Smash Bros. for Wii U coming out?”– remains unanswered, and as such, so too does the question of when the amiibo figures the game interacts with will be available. However, other release details have been afforded us, including the identities of the initial dozen– Mario, Peach, Link, Samus, Yoshi, Donkey Kong, Pikachu, Kirby, Fox, Marth, Villager, and Wii Fit Trainer– and that they will each be priced at $13.99, with pre-orders available now.

On the subject of Super Smash Bros., however, those who register both the Nintendo 3DS and Wii U versions of the title through Club Nintendo will be eligible to receive Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS & Wii U: Premium Sound Selection, a soundtrack CD packed with music taken from and inspired by the games. It’s not quite what I had in mind on that front, but a welcome step up nonetheless, and more details about this offer are coming in the future.

Oh, and in a separate announcement, Nintendo revealed that Shulk from the Xenoblade Chronicles franchise would be a playable character in both games:

Pokémon Omega Ruby and Pokémon Alpha Sapphire for Nintendo 3DS will be available in both stores and the Nintendo eShop on Nintendo 3DS on November 21st. Not a lot was said, other than “Trainers will catch, battle and trade Pokémon as they immerse themselves into a grand tale that draws ever closer to the heart of the secrets behind Mega Evolution and the power of Primal Groudon and Primal Kyogre.”

Just in time for Halloween, Bayonetta 2 (which also includes the first game and Nintendo cosplay options for the titular hero, of course) has a release date locked down for October 24th. “The game features over-the-top battles with wild weapons that take place in gorgeous set pieces,” notes the press release, and “a new snake transformation lets Bayonetta better navigate underwater.”

Captain Toad: Treasure Tracker still has no release date, but those concerned about where to pre-order Hyrule Warriors from with regards to the pre-order downloadable content can rest a little easier: The details will come later, but all the costumes will be available to purchase in due time.

More immediately, though, “Nintendo plans to support the game for the long run with more content to help players expand their adventures even farther. That program kicks off when the game launches on September 26th. People who buy the game will receive access to a free download that adds a new mode, a new weapon, and the option to select music to add to the Hyrule Warriors experience.”

While Pokémon Art Academy will be available for Nintendo 3DS on October 24th, the Wii U eShop-exclusive version of Art Academy is still only slated for “2014.”

On December 5th, NES Remix Pack— a two-in-one retail disc containing both NES Remix and NES Remix 2 (click for my respective reviews) will become available. The price given is $29.99 with a caveat that the Canadian price could change, while the Nintendo eShop versions will remain available for $14.99 each. On a personal note, I wish they’d released the disc sooner– I’ve loved both games and having them stored on my Wii U console is handy, but the classically-styled box would just look so good on my shelf.

On a related note: Fans have demanded it, and now they’re finally getting it… sort of. That same day, Ultimate NES Remix hits the Nintendo 3DS and will be available in stores and in the Nintendo eShop, also for $29.99 (similarly subject to change). “The game features rapid-fire challenges and mashups from a selection of 16 of Nintendo’s finest 8-bit games. Regional online leaderboards will let players see how they stack up against others in their area, and Championship Mode offers a series of challenges from three different games.”

As the first NES Remix contains 16 different games and the sequel features a dozen, it should be interesting to see what the Nintendo 3DS version pulls together for its offering– especially if they’re both the same price.

Fantasy Life will be available for the Nintendo 3DS at retail and in the Nintendo eShop on October 24th– a day with growing significance, apparently. “Fantasy Life lets players become the masters of their destinies as choices they make help determine their own Fantasy Life. Players can easily change their Life Class at any time and experience how each offers a new perspective on the world. Local and online multiplayer options let friends share the adventure, the exploration and the bounty.”

That same day, a downloadable content pack for the game will also be available. “Origin Island offers a new area that is home to an ancient culture and powerful enemies, additional story content, new ranks to achieve in Life Classes, access to even more powerful equipment and two new varieties of pets to adopt: birds and dragons.”

In a bit of a surprise, today marks the beginning of the availability of Dedede’s Drum Dash Deluxe and Kirby Fighters Deluxe, expanded stand-alone versions of two mini-games featured in May’s Kirby Triple Deluxe. “This version includes five new stages and a new team battle feature. Players who already own Kirby: Triple Deluxe with StreetPass data will get bonus content in both downloadable games.” I spoke of the two versions included in my review, but I’ll go into further detail should I find myself in a position to review the stand-alone releases and their expanded features.

On the indie game front, Curve Digital’s Stealth Inc 2 is slated for a fall release in the Wii U eShop and promises a mix of puzzle solving, action platforming, and stealth, as well as a “two-player co-op mode, level editor, off-TV play and Miiverse integration.” Ronimo Games’ side-scrolling action strategy game, Swords & Soldiers II, comes to the Wii U this holiday season.

In October, a system update for the Nintendo 3DS will yield new themes that can change the background, icons and folders, music, and sound effects of the Nintendo 3DS’s Home menu, purchasable from a new Theme Shop added to the menu. More details are still to come in the future.

In addition to the games, Nintendo is offering some new bundles for newcomers as well. The Super Mario 3D World Deluxe Set will be released in mid-September and include the Wii U console with physical copies of Super Mario 3D World and Nintendo Land for a suggested retail price of $299.99. Meanwhile, Walmarts across Canada will offer a special-edition Wii U bundle starting September 25th that includes the console and physical copies of Mario Kart 8 and Nintendo Land, also at a suggested retail price of $299.99. “This exclusive bundle will be available while supplies last.”

On the portable side of things, Nintendo will be offering three new Nintendo 2DS bundles. For $129.99 each, you can get an Electric Blue, Crimson Red or Sea Green Nintendo 2DS system with a code to download Mario Kart 7 from the Nintendo eShop. The three bundles will be available beginning in early October.

Finally, there are more than 60 third party offerings to come across the various platforms, all summed up by this handy chart:

 

Publisher

Title

Release Date

Wii U

Activision

Skylanders Trap Team

October 5

BANDAI NAMCO Games America, Inc.

PAC-MAN and the Ghostly Adventures 2

October 14

Disney Interactive

Disney Infinity: Marvel Super Heroes (2.0 Edition)

September 23

Little Orbit

Penguins of Madagascar

November 25

Little Orbit

Disney Planes: Fire & Rescue

November 4

Mobot Studios

Paper Monster Recut

September

SEGA

Sonic Boom: Rise of Lyric

November 18

Ubisoft

Just Dance 2015

October 21

Ubisoft

Watch Dogs

2014

Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment

LEGO Batman 3: Beyond Gotham

November 11

WayForward Technologies

Shantae and the Pirate’s Curse

2014

Nintendo eShop on Wii U

Ackk Studios LLC

Chromophore: The Two Brothers Director’s Cut

Q4

Arachnid Games

Ballpoint Universe: Infinite

Fall

ATLUS

Citizens of Earth

November 4

BeautiFun Games SL

Nihilumbra

Winter

Breakfall

STARWHAL: Just the Tip

Q1 2015

Curve Digital

Lone Survivor

Q4

Curve Digital

Stealth Inc 2

Fall

Curve Digital

The Swapper

Q3

Frima Studio Inc.

Chariot

Fall

Image & Form

SteamWorld Dig

August 28

KnapNok Games

Affordable Space Adventures

Q1 2015

Midnight City

Costume Quest 2

October 7

Midnight City

Gone Home

Q4

Natsume Inc.

Alphadia Genesis

2014

Nnooo

Cubemen 2

September 4

Nyamyam Ltd.

Tengami

Fall

Over the Moon Games

The Fall

August 26

Rain Games

Teslagrad

September

Ronimo Games BV

Swords & Soldiers II

Q4

Slightly Mad

Project CARS

2015

Turtle Cream

6180 the moon

Q4

WaterMelon

Pier Solar and the Great Architects

Fall

Nintendo 3DS

Activision

Skylanders Trap Team

October 5

Activision

The Legend of Korra: A New Era Begins

October 28

ATLUS

Persona Q: Shadow of the Labyrinth

November 25

BANDAI NAMCO Games America, Inc.

PAC-MAN and the Ghostly Adventures 2

October 14

BANDAI NAMCO Games America, Inc.

Saban’s Power Rangers Super Megaforce

October 28

BANDAI NAMCO Games America, Inc.

TENKAI KNIGHTS: Brave Battle

October 7

Capcom

Monster Hunter 4 Ultimate

Early 2015

EA

EA SPORTS FIFA 15

September

GameMill

Big Hero 6

October 28

Little Orbit

Adventure Time: The Secret of the Nameless Kingdom

November 18 

Little Orbit

Disney Planes: Fire & Rescue

November 4 

Little Orbit

Penguins of Madagascar

November 25

Little Orbit

Winx Club: Saving Alfea

Fall

Majesco

Cooking Mama 5: Bon Appetit!

September 16

Marvelous USA (XSEED Games)

Story of Seasons

Winter

Natsume Inc.

Harvest Moon: The Lost Valley

October

SEGA

Sonic Boom: Shattered Crystal

November 11

Square Enix, Inc.

THEATRHYTHM FINAL FANTASY CURTAIN CALL

September 16

Ubisoft

Petz Beach

October 14

Ubisoft

Petz Countryside

October 14

Ubisoft

Poptropica: Forgotten Islands

October 14

Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment

LEGO Batman 3: Beyond Gotham

November 11

 

Nintendo eShop on Nintendo 3DS

ATLUS

Citizens of Earth

November 4

Big John Games

Cube Creator 3D

Q1 2015

Big John Games

Lionel Trains 3D

Q1 2015

Big John Games

Thorium Wars: Attack of the Skyfighter

August 28

Capcom

Phoenix Wright Ace Attorney Trilogy

Winter 

Choice Provisions

Woah Dave!

Fall

CINEMAX

The Keep

September

Goodbye Galaxy Games

Tappingo 2

September 4

Hörberg Productions

Gunman Clive 2

Fall

Inti Creates Co. Ltd.

Azure Striker GUNVOLT

August 29

Konami Digital Entertainment, Inc.

Yu-Gi-Oh! ZEXAL World Duel Carnival

September 25

Nnooo

Blast ’Em Bunnies

Q1 2015

Renegade Kid LLC

Moon Chronicles (ep. 2)

Q4

Renegade Kid LLC

Treasurenauts

Q4 

Renegade Kid LLC

Xeodrifter

Q4

WayForward Technologies

Shantae and the Pirate’s Curse

2014


“Nintendo’s holiday offerings demonstrate a combination of fun franchises and great value,” said Nintendo of Canada’s vice-president and general manager, Ron Bertram. “With Wii U and Nintendo 2DS hardware bundles, classic names like Super Smash Bros., Bayonetta, and Pokémon, new IP like Captain Toad: Treasure Tracker, and amiibo, everyone will find something to love about Nintendo this holiday season. Whether people are shopping for themselves or they’re prepping their gift lists, Nintendo has them covered.”

Finally, Nintendo has released the following trailer to highlight past, present, and future Wii U releases. Enjoy!